Calming the Speaker With Movement

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Public speaking is a fear many people face.  There have been multiple moments in my teaching career when I have encountered a terrified student sweating about giving a presentation, whether it was a presentation meant to be delivered individually or as a group.  In some cases, the student spoke so softly hardly anyone could hear the presentation.  In other cases, the student claimed to have forgotten what he or she was supposed to talk about, so an awkward silence would fill the room.  There were times where a one-on-one presentation opportunity was given to alleviate the burden of public speaking.  Yet, there were also moments (more often than not), when the presentations went smoothly with little hint of anxiety present.

Using physical movement can help reduce stress and anxiety public speaking tends to build in students.  There are multiple ways to add physical movement before public speaking moments.

  1.  Rubric Gallery:  Before starting the presentations for the day, post the rubric around the room.  Ask students to walk around the room to remind themselves of the expectations. As they do so, inform students to generate a goal they have for their presentations. Their goal should include a plan and an indicator to measure their success.
  2. Main Point Tableau:  Students take notes of the main points a speaker is making during his or her presentation.  At the end of the speaker’s presentation, students should stand.  On the teacher’s signal, the students should freeze in a body position that represents a main point of the presentation. The teacher may ask a couple of students to explain their poses and a brief review of the speech can take place.
  3. Wall to Wall Practice:  Students line up on one side of the classroom.  On the signal, students slowly walk to the other side of the classroom reviewing the main points of their presentation. When they get to the other side, they turn around and return to the other side of the classroom.
  4. Speaking Ball Toss:  In groups of five, students toss a koosh ball around the circle.  When they toss the ball, they say a main point of their presentation.  They can also orally state the main components of their speak outline.  For example, they might state a three-word reminder of the hook of their introduction during their first toss.  On their second toss, they might state a phrase from their thesis, and so on.
  5. Small Group Walk:  Journey outdoors (or into the hallway) and have students complete a walk and talk presentation.  In groups of five, one of the students delivers his or her presentation to the rest of the group (and the teacher). The student can walk during the entire presentation or pause as often as he or she feels the need to do so.

Public speaking is scary for many people, but it doesn’t have to be the beast it is perceived as being. By listening and observing the feelings of students as they prepare for and anticipate presentations, teachers can counter some of the fear and anxiety students are expressing. Adding movement is just one way teachers can begin to address this fear.  Providing students with the appropriate skills they need can help them conquer the fear and feel a bit of success.

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Flying Through Reading

 

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Working with nonfiction texts can be a challenge for students and teachers.  Many nonfiction texts contain higher lexile levels and higher levels of complexity.  Maintaining a sense of focus for struggling readers may determine the comprehension success of the text.

When I assign a complex nonfiction text, I approach the text using the following steps.

  1.  Setting a purpose.  Since struggling readers sometimes have a difficult time understanding why a certain text is being read in class, it is important to set a purpose for reading.  Setting a purpose helps students focus on the “why” behind the reading.  When students have a clear focus, they can power through obstacles that may get in their way such as unfamiliar words, text structure, and text length.
  2. Chunking the text.  Dividing the text into manageable pieces helps build confidence and endurance. In a two-page article, I divide the text into a minimum of three chunks.  Of course, the number of chunks is dependent on the length of the text and the age of the students. When a text has clear divisions, such as headings and subheading, this is an easier task.  However, it is important to provide students with specific reading strategies to help them understand what to do during a chunk of reading, what to do at the end of a chunk of reading, and how to proceed to the next chunk of reading.
  3. Adding movement. With the struggling reading, as well as any reading engaging in a challenging text, I like to give students the opportunity to move at the end of a chunk of reading.  The type of movement used, and the purpose of the movement, may change based what students are asked to do with the text as well as the type of readers reading the text. For example, I may add movement to help students with comprehension, or I have students participate in a reading activity designed for deeper analysis.

Flying Airplanes

There are multiple uses for this activity.  I mentioned this activity in an earlier post, but I recently used this activity as a during reading activity.  The activity is basic, but it does get students up and moving while they are reading.

At the end of a chunk of reading, students are asked to identify textual evidence that supports the overall purpose for reading the text. Students write a piece of textual evidence on a sheet of paper and then they fold the piece of paper into a paper airplane. The class is then divided in half.  Half of the class lines up on one side of the classroom and half of the class lines up on the other side of the classroom.  The students fly their airplanes to the center of the room, and then they choose an airplane to take back to their desks.  At their desks, they read the piece of textual evidence and discuss it in a pair or in a small group.  The students proceed to read the second chunk of text. At the end of the second chunk of text, they repeat the process.  The activity continues until all three chunks of text have been read.

At the end of the reading, each student will have a piece of paper with three pieces of textual evidence to match the purpose of reading. A class discussion of the evidence may then occur, or students may be assigned a writing prompt.  The activity prepares students to look for evidence and analyze evidence of their peers. When writing, all students, regardless of their reading ability, will have textual evidence to use in responding to a prompt.

This activity can be modified in many ways.  Instead of textual evidence, students could draw pictures summarizing key points.  Students could also answer basic comprehension questions, or they could answer (or develop) higher-order thinking questions.

Providing students with the opportunity to stand during reading, gives them a chance to think about what they have read.  It also gives them an opportunity to refocus on another chunk of reading by breaking up the monotony of a being seated while reading a challenging text for an extended amount of time.  It also helps reduce stress and anxiety a struggling reader is faced with leading to a more positive and successful reading experience.

Image:  http://maxpixel.freegreatpicture.com/static/photo/1x/Flight-Air-Show-Flying-Formation-Planes-Contrail-285568.jpg

SNOW DAY, Snow Forts, and Writing

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We recently had two snow days in our district.  Since snow comes and goes pretty quickly in the Seattle area, I love the time we have to get out and play.  Entire neighborhoods spill into local parks and school playgrounds to g0 sledding, build snowmen, fortify snow forts, and just run around. The smiles, laughter, and overall general feeling of happiness is a welcome sight during the doldrums of gray skies in winter.

My daughter and I worked tirelessly to build a snow fort on the football field of the neighboring school.  We had a great time determining the height, depth, and interior finishes expected by a fourth-grader. It was a moment cemented in my mind, one that will stick for a long time.

The activity sparked my imagination for establishing a writing space in the classroom.  Building, fortifying, and elaborating the writing process is something all young writers need to experience to develop their skills.

For this activity, various components of the writing process are hung around the classroom.  A prompt (or multiple prompts) are given to students to focus on. Working in small groups, one member of the group retrieves a writing component and brings it to the group work on.  Group members complete the task and attach their finished task to a building block (snow cube).  A second group member retrieves another component, the group works on the task, and then add to their snow cubes.  As the group works, they determine the organization of their snow walls.

After a set amount of time, a signal is given and students work on the elaboration of their writing.  Once this task has been completed the snow forts represent a specific mode of writing within a paragraph, poem, essay, etc.  Groups share their responses by walking around and observing the structures.

Several discussion ideas may follow:

  1.  What are similarities between each of the writing samples?
  2. How did groups extend their writing?
  3. What are key organizational concepts we need to remember when writing _____?
  4. What are the foundation pieces of this writing style?

 

The writing tasks may include:

  1.  Sentence starters/types (topic sentence, textual evidence, analysis, concluding sentences)
  2. Essay structure (introduction paragraph, body paragraphs, concluding paragraphs)
  3. Visuals/Charts/Graphics/Pictures
  4. Simple sentences to extend

 

This activity can be modified in beyond the snow fort concept.  It has can be adapted to include the snowball fight activity explained in an earlier post.

 

Image: https://c1.staticflickr.com/5/4039/4379451099_174ce13aae_z.jpg?zz=1

It’s the Holiday Season, so get up and Move

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The holiday season is probably my favorite time of year.  My family has several traditions we enjoy that only happen at during the months of November and December.  My two children have grown to not only anticipate these activities but appreciate them. From participating in a fun run, to watching a holiday parade, to making gingerbread houses with leftover Halloween candy, to picking the right tree to cut down, to spending quiet time singing and reflecting about all of the action around us.

The excitement of the season paired with the anxiety some students face over the uncertainty of their situation during a break from a structured environment can create challenging moments for the classroom teacher.

Teachers are often coached to keep classrooms relatively normal during this time of year to help reduce the anxiety and stress some students are feeling. Even though the classroom may start to feel a little chaotic during this stretch of the year, it is a perfect time to integrate physical movement in the classroom.  Since there is the potential for an increase in chaos, it is also a time to reinforce physical movement protocols and routines.  Physical movement reduces the levels of stress and anxiety fostering a safe environment for students so learning can occur. Some of my favorite lessons at this time of year include:

Snowball fight:  Questions regarding a lesson are written on a sheet of paper.  The teacher tells students to write an answer on the sheet of paper, wad the piece of paper into a ball, and stand on the sides of the classroom.  When the teacher signals, students throw the balls into the center of the classroom.  Students pick up a ball, straighten it out, add to the answer of the question and then repeat the activity.

Vocabulary Snowflake:  Each student creates a large snowflake.  It may be helpful to show a brief youtube video of a simple design. Once the snowflake has been created, students write a vocabulary word somewhere on the snowflake.  The snowflakes are then hung around the walls of the classroom.  Students then are instructed to quietly find a snowflake and add an antonym, sketch, or sentence for a new word.  Students move around the classroom adding missing elements to each snowflake.

Snow boots Shuffle:  A pair of snow boots is positioned on a table top.  Discussion questions/pictures are color coded and then cut in two.  Students select a piece from the boots and find their matching partner.  The pair discussion the question or prompt with the option of moving around the room.

There are several options for movement, but adding a seasonal flare creates novelty and increases the motivation students have to reflect, review, learn, and explore.

 

 

Reaching the Reader with Starbucks

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I love this time of year.  The fall season feels like an extended holiday season regardless of the holidays each person celebrates:  Halloween and Thanksgiving followed by the Winter Break holidays. Students, administration, teachers, and parents love giving and receiving  gifts.  With the recent reveal of the 2016 Starbucks Holiday Cups, it is a time to embrace the current season and the holidays to come.

Starbucks has become commonplace to represent coffee around the U.S and the world. Students at all levels are able to identify with the company, logo, and the coffee it serves. In many cities, rural and urban, students have indulged themselves with frappuccinos, lattes, hot chocolate, and steamed milk. Teachers frequent Starbucks this time of year with Peppermint Mochas and Egg Nog Lattes. Admin. teams  and PTA groups often donate carafes of coffee to the teachers’ lounge. Parents and students enjoy peppering teachers with Starbucks gift cards which teachers graciously accept adding to their holiday cheer.

Adding gimmicks to a lesson provides creativity, engages the mind, and increases student motivation.  Gimmicks also help students connect interests to content.  Utilizing physical movement along with gimmicks adds more intrigue and fosters increased brain activity encouraging synaptic connections.

For this activity, Starbucks, movement, and reading have been combined to provide a stimulating experience.

Items You Will Need:

  • Starbucks Coffee Cups (Disposable)
  • Coffee lids
  • Cup Sleeve
  • Coffee Cup Carriers
  • Used Gift Cards

Preparation:

  • Starbucks Coffee Cups (Write a character’s name on cup)
  • Coffee lids (Inference based on character’s actions)
  • Cup Sleeve (Main personality traits of character or textual evidence)
  • Coffee Cup Carriers (Setting description -consider how setting shapes character)
  • Used Gift Cards (vocabulary/literary term written- 1 per card) Hang gift cards from the ceiling or display them around room

To stage the activity, cups will be in one station, lids in another, sleeves in a third, and carriers in a fourth. The gift cards will be hanging or displayed on walls.

To perform the activity, students sit in groups of four.  The teacher informs students that they need to get drinks ready for their study groups. However, unlike going to a real Starbucks, students work together to get their drink orders ready.  Only one person from the groups can be up at a time. The first person must grab a cup. The second-fourth student can go in any order to retrieve the other items. Once each group has one of each item, the group decides if any of the items needs to be returned to its original location.  Groups continue to work until they have four cups (with lids and sleeves) that go together in their carrier.

Depending on the reading content, there can be duplicates. There can be multiple settings at play as well as multiple stories.  This activity can also be used with nonfiction and as a review for a unit of study. At the culmination of the activity, students can decorate the coffee cups and carriers with visuals from the text or additional textual evidence to support their combination.

While the activity takes initial setup time, it is a fun activity to review a text and prepare for a deeper analysis essay or discussion. The activity engages the mind through movement, higher-level thinking skills, and collaboration.

As you start to collect Starbucks coffee cups and gift cards, consider using them to further the education of your students!  Happy Fall and Happy Holidays!

 

 

Writer’s Block and Physical Movement

writer-605764_960_720I often present and write about using physical movement in classes that teach reading and writing.  The reading process is often viewed as an easier link for teachers to make between teaching reading strategies and incorporating physical movement activities.  A harder connection for teachers is linking writing and physical movement. I recently wrote an article published by AMLE Magazine about how to help adolescent learners overcome writer’s block with some simple movement activities.  The following link accesses the article.

Addressing Writer’s Block Through Physical Movement

 

Building Reading Comprehension with Legos

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My son loves legos. If given the option to do anything, he would spend all day building, creating, and diving into the imaginary world associated with all things legos.

A pile of legos will make many kids happy. Manipulating various shapes, colors, and textures of blocks excites students from kindergarten to middle school to adulthood. Providing students with the time to use their imagination and creativity to build something and associate it with learning allows them to engage multiple senses and areas of the brain sparking synaptic connections increasing the cognitive experience of students in the classroom.

There are several ways to motivate students to read and to perform necessary tasks associated with reading comprehension and analysis. Giving students opportunities to work with legos before, during, and after reading adds a kinesthetic and visual component to the process.

One activity that can be used during reading is to provide each student, or table groups of students, with a bag of legos. During the before reading process, students should chunk the text.  Preferably, teachers would choose a text that is already set up with heading and subheadings to make the sections of the text visible to students. After students read a section of the text, time would be given to the students to pause and create a lego representation of what was read. The skills involved may range from focusing on simple details to analyzing arguments through inferences and tone. The lego representation could be completed individually or as a team.  When all teams have completed the task, a table group gallery walk could take place for each team to see the work of other teams. The hands-on approach to visualization offers time for mind-body connections to be made associated with a text or reading skill.

A variation of this activity could emphasize lego colors. In this variation, students are provided with specific lego colors. Each color could represent a specific reading skill or concept. For example, groups could be charged with creating a visual representation of a particular section.  Green legos could represent main details of the passage and red legos could represent inferences based on the details.  The overall visual would symbolize the text.  Another example could be based on colors and numbers. Blue legos could form the base of the visual and represent the topic sentence. Yellow legos could be added to represent details, and black legos could represent descriptive words used throughout the paragraph. The activity can be extended to include lego people and objects. The options are endless.

While legos may be intimidating to some teachers, the novelty students experience makes the activity worthwhile.  The levels of cognitive engagement are various as are the levels of high-level thinking opportunities.